ONCAP II Hits Home Run With Sale of Canadian Securities Institute

Canadian Securities Institute Global Education Inc. was recently sold by one of Onex’s private equity funds to Moody’s Analytics for $155 million Cdn.

ONCAP paid $25 million for a 91% stake in the company which was spun off by the securities industry back in 2006. Onex’s share of the company was 40%.

When the sale was made back in 2006, the multiple that ONCAP paid was somewhat frothy. However, closing regional offices, converting all exams to mutiple choice for quick computerized marking, coupled with 200% fee increases to take an industry exam made CSI extremely profitable on what can be considered a monopoly as an education content provider in the securities industry in Canada.

As an industry participant, one can only hope that Moody’s will keep fees reasonable as educational requirements keep increasing and double digit course fee increases seem to be the norm.

Your comments are always appreciated.

Action List Worth A Look

Our Canadian research comes from National Bank. Since November, 2009, they have produced an Action list where their analysts provide their best ideas. In conjunction with their recommendations, they also recommend when to sell these holdings based on price appreciation or earnings surprises.

From November 30th, 2009 to June 30th, 2010, 27 names have appeared on the list with 13 still on the list. In the last quarter, five names were removed while six were added.

In the last quarter, the NBF Action List returned 3.76% vs. -0.33% for the TSX. Since November 30, the Action List netted 6.13% vs. 0.81% for the TSX.

The Action List is updated daily. To get the current action list, please don’t hesitate to contact us and we would be happy to email or send you a copy.

Have a great weekend. Your comments are always appreciated.

Consider Corporate Bonds over Alberta Capital Bonds

The Alberta government announced the rate on Capital bonds on Friday with a rate of 3.3%. The rate is equivalent to what is available on 5 year GIC’s. Considering limited liquidity, you may want to consider buying corporate bonds or 5 year Fixed Rate Reset Preferred shares.

The rates on corporate bonds can be as high as 7% depending on quality and maturity and a select number of preferreds are yielding above 5% with preferrential tax treatment.

Call your Rothenberg Investment Advisor today discuss the various options available in the market place. Your comments and thoughts are always appreciated.

Canadian Investment Idol Competition

We would like to congratulate Mr. Joseph Weisz of Montreal, Quebec for winning the first Rothenberg Capital Management Canadian Investment Idol Competition powered by Claymore ETF’s. Mr. Weisz had a return of 15.02% over the eight week time frame.

To view all of our weekly winners, you can click on the link HERE.

 

Have a great week.

Life Settlements in Difficulty in Canada

I have seen some ads in the Calgary Herald advertising life settlements yielding 10%. The ads definitely peaked my interest as this was something different than real estate, commodities, equities or even the bond market.

To have a different asset class paying a 10% yield would be quite attractive. Of course, with the rash of real estate deals going south and ponzi schemes rearing their head, one can only be skeptical.

The underlying concept behind life settlements is that a company offers an individual that is diagnosed with a life threatening illness a lump sum while they are alive in return for the proceeds from a life insurance policy upon death.

The company raises money from individuals paying them the 10% interest rate. They are supposed to pay the individuals from the proceeds of the policies which is difficult to pinpoint as they cannot guarantee when a policyholder will die.

The industry is growing in the US with about $12 Billion in policies sold in 2007 according to an article in this weeks investment executive. In Canada, the purchasing of policies is illegal in most provinces so the ones being offered for sale are from jurisdictions outside of Canada.

The main issue that is now plaguing this sector is similar to other unregulated industries. The individuals selling the policies are not registered to do so and are not offering proper documentation to potential investors outlining the risks.

Two companies in Ontario selling these policies have been shutdown while one in Alberta is currently being investigated.

All one needs to do is visit the Ontario Securities Commission or Alberta Securities Commission websites and do a search on life settlements to get more details on some of the issues.

If you have had any positive or negative experiences in this area, your feedback would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

Headline Deflation Number Not Worth Reporting

Media outlets have been reporting that inflation was -0.9% for the last 12 months in Canada. Many people will listen to that one number and not look any further.

The headline number includes food and energy prices with energy prices being the main reason for the decline since a barrel of oil in July 2008 was trading as high as $147 a barrel compared to $70 today.

As a result, gasoline prices dropped 28%. The decline in energy prices was quick and steep and will quickly disappear from the deflationary number being reported.

Core inflation which excludes these items was 1.8% and right in line with the 2% target of the Bank of Canada. There was nothing in this report to indicate a change in Bank of Canada interest rate policy.

Going forward, expect energy prices to contribute to the headline inflation number. Just like my post of a couple of weeks ago disecting the jobless numbers, it is always important to read more than the headline in order to say informed.

Your comments and inquiries are always appreciated.

Bonds Are Not Stocks

Bonds are not stocks.

The title of this post seems quite obvious in nature yet the amount of calls we received after Manulife cut the dividend on its common shares and how it affected the pricing and interest payments on their corporate debt was quite astounding.

Earnings per share for the company increased to $1.09 in the second quarter compared to $0.66 for the same quarter last year which is a positive.

The dividend cut will save the company $800 million per year. The savings is a positive for bondholders as there is more money available to make interest payments on their debt and pay principal back at maturity.

Unlike common shares or stock where a company can cut the dividend as it sees fit, the company cannot decide to stop making interest payments as part of a change to its strategic plan.

This is why bonds of a corporation are safer than common shares of the same corporation. There is limited upside but you have layers of downside protection. So what happened to the bonds on the day of the announcement? Not much. Manulife’s 10 year bonds dropped about 1% compared to 15% on their stock.

Corporate bonds move up and down in value based on several factors including interest rates, creditworthiness, and the spread between government bonds moving up or down. To learn more about bonds and how they differ from stocks, you can click on the following link HERE on our website that has an educational piece on bonds.

Your comments are always appreciated.